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83-Year-Old 10-Foot-Wide New York House Was Built With Used Materials

"MAMARONECK, N.Y. — The red-shingled house on Grand Street shares several attributes with its neighbors. It has three stories, a full basement, hardwood floors and a neat yard.
But one thing has always set this house apart, turning heads on nearby Interstate 95 and, last week, prompting New York officials to recommend its addition, along with 21 other properties and districts, to the National Register of Historic Places: It is only 10 feet wide.
Called the Skinny House, the gabled structure stitched into a modest street in this Westchester County suburb has a back story to rival its unusual architecture.
It was built in 1932 by Nathan T. Seely, an African-American carpenter who, with his brother Willard, had a successful home-building business that catered to the waves of black Southerners moving north as part of the Great Migration.…"
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/30/nyregion/in-westchester-a-wisp-of-a-home-built-in-the-depression-seeks-a-long-future.html
Story by Lisa W.Foderaro

Photo: Andrew Sullivan for The New York Times

Adventures With Alastair Humphreys


I've done 2 posts on him in previous years,  and was reminded of him again by an article in the New York Times recently listing his book Microadventures: Local Discoveries for Great Escapes.
http://www.alastairhumphreys.com/adventures/

Over the Rainbow - Gene Vincent

http://grooveshark.com/s/Over+The+Rainbow/6FsSty?src=5

Update on Lucas Sweeten's Schoolbus Home

Lucas' bus was featured on pp. 70-71 of Tiny Homes on the Move. Here's the latest:


April 3, 2015
Hey Hey there Lloyd, I wanted to give you an update on the bus. Also, I really appreciated you working with me for the timeline and putting my bus in your book.… So, for the update: I'll attach a few pictures of the bus. Naturally it's not finished. It most likely will never be, but as we know that is the joy of a custom mobile life.

Since the past pictures I've rebuilt most of the interior using wood I've cut, milled, stacked and dried (all done a few years back), or wood that I've salvaged. There's a 400 watt solar system, 12v lighting, converted freezer to fridge (not in the pics), deck on top, pull behind trailer/porch, and concrete shower. The floors are plumbed with radiant heat pex tubing.  I have a thermal solar panel although it's not installed yet. The grey water tank is in, and finally some curtains are being hung.

In just a few weeks I'll be taking her on the true maiden voyage. Granted I'll be driving back to where it was about 6 months ago but, I'll be living in it this time for the foreseeable future. It will be a short stay in Kentucky before heading to Maine, which is my final destination. In Maine I'll be attending a metalwork school for the rest of the year followed by a fine furniture making school. Thanks again and I hope you enjoy.
    Lucas Sweeten

True Costs of Using Recycled Materials

From my Facebook Author page: (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Lloyd-Kahn/110048295717073?v=wall)  Note, I don't do Facebook actively; I just have my blog posts put up automatically. There's just not enough time in my day to be a full Facebook participant.

Hey Lloyd Kahn, Thanks again for all your hard work, you inspire us! I have noticed a lot of articles in the tiny home archives over the years mentioning such statements as "Man builds tiny home for $500..." what about his total labor time, and those often overlooked overhead costs... do you find such a statement at all misleading? I am a licensed builder myself, running a company in Portland, OR and feel as tho I often have to re-educate clients as to what the "actual costs" of construction really are (mostly the cost of my Time.) This conversation inevitably arises when during design phase we discuss the option of reclaimed materials... which almost always ends up costing more $ (sourcing, milling, install.) Hooray for folks who are living their dreams building a place of their own with their "free time", but let's also paint a realistic picture by including the price of time, and thus value the craft appropriately. As a builder yourself, any of your thoughts would be appreciated.
-Kiel Kellow

Kiel, You're absolutely right, the costs (as here) are way more than $500 if you consider labor. Time is precious.
-Lloyd

The Forgotten Treehouse Bars of Bygone Summers in Paris

"There was once a place that drew crowds of Parisians away from their grand boulevards and sidewalk cafés to rediscover their inner child, wine & dine in chestnut tree houses and celebrate summer like Robinson Crusoe.

Perhaps you’ve heard of a “guingette”, a sort of French equivalent to a summer hoedown, traditionally located next to the river and particularly popular in the the 19th and early 20th century, serving food and ample drinks, accompanied by lively music and dancing. Monet and Renoir immortalised such vibrant scenes in their paintings but it seems the most enchanting of these summer establishments has been long forgotten by Parisians…"
http://bit.ly/1DKwo09
From David Wills

"Holy Cow" by Lee Dorsey

My son Will turned me on to Lee Dorsey last week, can't believe I never heard of him. Born in New Orleans in 1924, was buddies with Fats Domino, many of his songs produced by Alan Toussaint, backed by The Meters. http://grooveshark.com/s/Holy+Cow/4CPgsG?src=5